To the virgins to make much of time poem robert herrick

Then be not coy, but use your time, And while ye may, go marry; For having lost but once your prime, You may forever tarry. You become exceedingly worse as you get older. Anything that might seem too wild and crazy is reigned in at the end of the poem by an overriding spirituality, a promotion of marriage, and a suggested equivalence between it and being "merry.

The higher the sun moves the closer he is to setting. One further irony regarding this poem: The speaker thinks he is doing these young gals a great service by insisting they marry before they dry up like an old weed. Observe how older political candidates are treated.

Robert Herrick

Popular culture[ edit ] The line "Gather ye rosebuds while ye may" was quoted by Rex Masters in the episode "The Animal Within" of the British television murder mystery Midsomer Murders. And while in reality there is no such thing a "setting" for the sun, the beauty of the poor little virgins will, in fact, run its course and set and then they are screwed ironic pun intended!

The line "Gather ye rosebuds while ye may" was quoted by Sixpence None the Richer on "Meaningless", track 7 of their album The Fatherless and the Widow. This is hinted at by the imagery employed in the first stanza: He might have in mind even the nosegay held by brides as they trundle down the aisle to join their grooms for the taking of the marriage vows.

At age 16, Herrick began a ten-year apprenticeship with his uncle. What does that mean? Before that, he had mixed with the literati of London as an enthusiastic disciple of the influential poet Ben Jonson.

To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time

The second stanza finds the speaker waxing redundant as he refers to the sun both metaphorically and literally: After about three months of hearing you talk about this person, your best friend finally tells you to either shut up or make a move. They should not "be coy" but hurry up and give themselves in matrimony so they can escape the limbo of torment that awaits them as old hags.

About Robert Herrick Robert Herrick lived a long life for a seventeenth-century man. Every day in class, you stare at him or her. The spelling, "rhyme," was introduced into English by Dr. Samuel Johnson through an etymological error. This is, technically speaking, highly efficient and tightly constructed verse — and this is important because the poet wants to convince us of the certainty of what he says.

The speaker tells the virgins that they should "gather" their "rosebuds" — get married — before they get too old.

Interesting Literature

Herrick was influenced by classical Roman poetry and wrote on pastoral themes, dealing mostly with English country life and village customs.

Saving the Damsels Then be not coy, but use your time, And while ye may, go marry; For having lost but once your prime, You may forever tarry.

This lends the lines a purposeful and decisive feel: This is also used during the drama whenever music is required. The line is featured in an exchange between the characters Josh Lyman and Donna Moss in the 16th episode of the first season of The West Wing.

This, essentially, is the point of "To the Virgins. Women who grow old transform from supple young buds into old stink weeds, and of course, no man will want to marry an old weed.

There is a song-like quality to the poem, with its jaunty rhythm and rhyme. Even though the poem talks about marriage, you could apply the "gather ye rosebuds" logic — the carpe diem philosophy — to just about anything: It basically means live life while you can.

The other three stanzas of the poem extend the central sentiment so pithily and perfectly expressed in that opening stanza.Robert Herrick’s poem, “To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time,” delivers a playful tone, which encourages the reader to live life to its fullest.

Tone as Attitude Tone is the speaker's attitude, and this attitude establishes the poem's atmosphere or mood.

What Is the Tone of the Poem

To The Virgins, Make Much Of Time by Robert Herrick. Gather ye rosebuds while ye may Old Time is still aflying And this same flower that smiles today Tomorrow will be dying. The glorious lamp of heaven/5(7). To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time Robert Herrick, - Gather ye rosebuds while ye may, Old Time is still a-flying; And this same flower that smiles today Tomorrow will be dying.

To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time Analysis

Robert Herrick's poem, "To the Virgins to Make Much of Time," spews out an egregious conglomeration of both sexism and agism, as the speaker urges young women to get married while they are still young, fresh, warm, and lovely enough to attract a man.

Born on August 24,Robert Herrick was the seventh child and fourth son born to a London goldsmith, Nicholas, and his wife, Julian Stone Herrick. To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time By Robert Herrick.

Robert Herrick's

Gather ye rose-buds while ye may, Old Time is still a-flying; More About This Poem To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time By Robert Herrick About this Poet Almost forgotten in the eighteenth century, and in the nineteenth century alternately applauded for his poetry’s lyricism and.

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To the virgins to make much of time poem robert herrick
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